language: Deutsch   Français   italiano   Español   Português   日本語   russian   arabic   norwegian   swedish   danish   Nederlands   finland   ireland   English  

DCA - Consumers - File Complaint

File Complaint

Having a problem with a business? Consumer Affairs Has Your Back. DCA enforces the City's Consumer Protection Law and uses mediation to help you resolve complaints  against a business. 

Important Information about Complaints

Please review our Referral List  (in PDF ) to make sure that DCA is the right agency to handle your complaint.

Do you have a complaint against your employer about the Paid Sick Leave Law? Click here to learn about your employee rights and file a complaint.

Ways to File a Consumer Complaint

Online:

Register or log in account with the City of New York to submit your complaint online. If you do not want to register an account, you can submit a complaint at 311 Online . Note: DCA will consider your complaint a tip if you do not provide your contact information.

Mail/Fax:

1. Download and complete our complaint form (in PDF ):

English   Español (Spanish) বাংলা (Bengali) 中文 (Chinese) Kreyòl Ayisyen (Haitian Creole) 한국어 (Korean) Русский (Russian)

2. Submit TWO copies of the completed form and related documents (e.g., store receipts, warranties, contracts, etc.). Do not send originals.

Mailing Address: NYC Department of Consumer Affairs Consumer Services Division 42 Broadway, 9th Floor New York, NY 10004

Fax: (212) 487-4482

What Happens to Your Complaint?

Our information sheet gives an overview of what Complaint-rid-0.html. moncler jackets usa online outlet storehappens when you file a complaint with DCA. Download the information sheet (in PDF ):

English

 


Complaint

outlet moncler.co.uk
moncler 18-24 months
moncler milano outlet address
outlet moncler italia
piumini moncler baby outlet

Company Filings | More Search Options

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Show — Main navigation Hide — Main navigation About What We Do Commissioners Securities Laws SEC Docket Reports and Publications Careers Contact Divisions Corporation Finance Enforcement Investment Management Economic and Risk Analysis Trading and Markets National Exam Program All Divisions and Offices Enforcement Litigation Releases Administrative Proceedings Opinions and Adjudicatory Orders Accounting and Auditing Trading Suspensions How Investigations Work Administrative Law Judges Regulation Rulemaking Index Proposed Rules Final Rules Interim Final Temporary Rules Other Orders and Notices Self-Regulatory Organizations Staff Interpretations Education Investor.gov Check Out a Broker or Adviser Investor Alerts and Bulletins Fast Answers File a Tip or Complaint Publications Filings EDGAR Search Tools Company Filing Search How to Search EDGAR Requesting Public Documents Forms List Information for Filers About EDGAR News Press Releases Public Statements Speeches Testimony Spotlight Topics What's New Upcoming Events Webcasts SEC Videos Media Gallery User account menu Log in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Divisions Enforcement Regulation Education Filings Newsroom Newsroom Press Releases Public Statements Speehes Testimony RSS Feeds Press Releases Public Statements Speeches Testimony Social Media @SEC_News SEC Channel SEC Photostream ABOUT THE SEC Commissioners Contact Data Divisions and Offices Regional Offices Division and Office Directors Forms Privacy and Security Reports and Publications SEC Docket Securities Laws Upcoming Events What We Do

Company Filings | More Search Options

Other Enforcement Tips and Complaints

Sept. 20, 2017

If you would like to provide us information about fraud or wrongdoing involving potential violations of the securities laws, which may include the conduct listed below, use the  Tips, Complaints and Referrals Portal . See also  further information about submitting a tip or complaint .

Ponzi scheme ,  Pyramid Scheme , or a  High-Yield Investment Program Theft or misappropriation of funds or securities Manipulation  of a security's price or volume Insider trading Fraudulent or  unregistered securities  offering False or misleading statements about a company (including false or misleading SEC reports or financial statements) Abusive naked  short selling Bribery of, or improper payments to, foreign officials Fraudulent conduct associated with  municipal securities  transactions or public pension plans Other fraudulent conduct

Important Notes

If you submit your information online through the SEC's Tips, Complaints and Referrals Portal, and would like to (1) be eligible to apply for a whistleblower award and/or (2) receive additional confidentiality protections (even if you do not wish to be considered for an award), you must answer "yes" to the question "Are you submitting this tip, complaint or referral pursuant to the SEC's whistleblower program?" on the "About You" page of the online questionnaire. You must also complete the whistleblower declaration at the end of the questionnaire.

The SEC treats all tips, complaints and referrals as confidential and nonpublic, and does not disclose such information to third parties, except in limited circumstances authorized by statute, rule, or other provisions of law. As a matter of practice, the whistleblower program provides additional confidentiality protections, consistent with the limitations on disclosure of information that could reasonably be expected to reveal the identity of a whistleblower set forth in Section 21F(h)(2) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 [15 U.S.C. § 78u-6(h)(2)] and Rule 21F-7 of the SEC's Whistleblower Rules [17 C.F.R. § 240.21F-7]. You should answer "yes" to the whistleblower program question if you wish to avail yourself of these additional confidentiality protections, even if you are not interested in being eligible for a whistleblower award.

Please be aware that these additional confidentiality protections may in some cases limit or delay the SEC's ability to disclose your identity to certain other agencies, regulators or other third parties. For that reason, we suggest you check "no" if you are submitting your information in order to seek our assistance to resolve an issue with your broker or other financial professional, such as the processing of a trade or a question about your statement. We likely will need to share your information in order to assist you. In addition, if you do not wish to be considered for an award and you intend for us to coordinate with another government agency or regulator, checking "no" may help facilitate this process. 

Please note that if you choose to submit your information anonymously under the whistleblower program, i.e., without providing your identity or contact information, and you wish to be eligible for a whistleblower award, you must be represented by, and provide contact information for, an attorney in connection with your submission.

Modified: Sept. 20, 2017 Footer menu Site Map Accessibility Contracts Privacy Inspector General Agency Financial Report Budget & Performance Careers Contact FOIA No FEAR Act & EEO Data Whistleblower Protection Votes Open Government Plain Writing Links Investor.gov USA.gov

complaint (redirected from Civil Complaint )
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia. Complaint

The Pleading that initiates a civil action; in Criminal Law, the document that sets forth the basis upon which a person is to be charged with an offense.

Civil Complaint

A civil complaint initiates a civil lawsuit by setting forth for the court a claim for relief from damages caused, or wrongful conduct engaged in, by the defendant. The complaint outlines all of the plaintiff's theories of relief, or causes of action (e.g., Negligence, Battery, assault), and the facts supporting each Cause of Action. The complaint also serves as notice to the defendant that legal action is underway. The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure govern construction of complaints filed in federal courts. Many state courts follow the same rules as the federal courts, or similar rules.

The caption opens the complaint and identifies the location of the action, the court, the docket or file number, and the title of the action. Each party to the lawsuit must be identified in the caption and must be a real party in interest, that is, either a person who has been injured or harmed in some way, or a person accused of causing the injury or harm. In addition, a party must have the capacity to sue or to be sued. If a party lacks capacity owing to mental incompetence, for example, the suit may be dismissed. Any number of parties may be named and joined in a single lawsuit as long as all meet the requirements of capacity and all are real parties in interest.

Courts of limited–subject matter jurisdiction, such as federal courts, require the complaint to demonstrate that the court has jurisdiction to hear the case. In general-jurisdiction courts, such as most state courts, a jurisdictional allegation is unnecessary.

The most critical part of the complaint is the claim, or cause of action. The claim is a concise and direct statement of the basis upon which the plaintiff seeks relief. It sets forth the Rule of Law that forms the basis of the lawsuit and recounts the facts that support the rule of law. Finally, the claim concludes that the defendant violated the rule of law, thereby causing the plaintiff's injuries or damages, and that the plaintiff is entitled to relief. For example: A negligence claim might begin with a statement that the defendant owed a duty of care to the plaintiff; that the defendant breached that duty; and that, as a result, the plaintiff suffered injuries or other damages. The conclusion then states that because the defendant's breach was the cause of the plaintiff's injuries, the plaintiff is entitled to compensation from the defendant.

The complaint may state separate claims or theories of relief in separate counts. For example, in a negligence case, count 1 might be for negligence, count 2 for breach of Warranty, and count 3 for Fraud. Each count contains a separate statement of the rule of law, supporting facts, and conclusion. There is no limit to the number of counts a plaintiff may include in one complaint.

Federal courts and other jurisdictions that follow the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure require a brief, simple pleading known as a notice pleading. The notice pleading informs the defendant of the allegations and the basis for the claim. The rules require that the complaint contain "a short and plain statement of the claim showing that the pleader is entitled to relief" (Fed. R. Civil P. 8[a]). Rule 8(c)(1) states, "Each averment of a pleading shall be simple, concise, and direct."

Following the claim, the prayer for relief or demand for judgment appears. Commonly called the wherefore clause, the prayer for relief demands judgment for the plaintiff and relief in the form of the remedies the plaintiff requests. The plaintiff may demand relief in several forms. Money damages are compensation for injuries and loss. General money damages cover injuries directly related to the defendant's actions—such as pain and suffering, or emotional distress. Special money damages arise indirectly from the defendant's actions and may include lost wages or medical bills. The court awards exemplary or Punitive Damages when the defendant's actions are particularly egregious. The purpose of punitive damages is to punish the defendant and deter similar wrongdoing. Other types of damages are recovery of property, injunctions, and Specific Performance of a contractual obligation. The plaintiff may demand alternative relief or several different types of relief, in the same complaint (Fed. R. Civ. P. 8[a]).

A demand for a jury trial may be included near the end of the complaint. The complaint must be signed by the plaintiff's attorney, indicating that the attorney has read the complaint; that it is grounded in fact, to the best of the attorney's knowledge, information, and belief; and that it is brought in Good Faith.

Criminal Complaint

A criminal complaint charges the person named or an unknown person with a particular offense. For example, after the bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995, authorities issued a john doe complaint, charging an unknown person or persons with the crime.

A criminal complaint must state the facts that constitute the offense and must be supported by Probable Cause. It may be initiated by the victim, a police officer, the district attorney, or another interested party. After the complaint is filed, it is presented to a magistrate, who reviews it to determine whether sufficient cause exists to issue an arrest warrant. If the magistrate determines that the complaint does not state sufficient probable cause, the complaint is rejected and a warrant is not issued. In federal court, the complaint is presented under oath (Fed. R. Crim. P. 3).

Further readings

Federal Employees News Digest, eds. 2000. Whistleblowing: A Federal Employee's Guide to Charges, Procedures, and Penalties. Reston, Va.: Federal Employees News Digest.

Kahan, Jeffrey B. 2001. "How to Prepare Response to Complaints." Los Angeles Lawyer 24 (April).

McCord, James W.H. "Drafting the Complaint: Defending and Testing the Lawsuit." Practising Law Institute 447.

Cross-references

Civil Procedure.

complaint

n. the first document filed with the court (actually with the County Clerk or Clerk of the Court) by a person or entity claiming legal rights against another. The party filing the complaint is usually called the plaintiff and the party against whom the complaint is filed is called the defendant or defendants. Complaints are pleadings and must be drafted carefully (usually by an attorney) to properly state the factual as well as legal basis for the claim, although some states have approved complaint forms which can be filled in by an individual. A complaint also must follow statutory requirements as to form. For example, a complaint must be typed on a specific type of paper or on forms approved by the courts, name both the party making the claim and all defendants, and should state what damages or performance is demanded (the prayer). When the complaint is filed, the court clerk will issue a summons, which gives the name and file number of the lawsuit and the address of the attorney filing the complaint, and instructs the defendant that he/she/it has a specific time to file an answer or other response. A copy of the complaint and the summons must be served on a defendant before a response is required. A complaint filing must be accompanied by a filing fee payable to the court clerk, unless a waiver based on poverty is obtained. (See: pleading, caption, answer, service of process, summons, in forma pauperis)

complaint noun  accusal, accusation, allegation, bill of indictment, case, case for the prosecution, charge, citation, count, crimination, criticism, denouncement, denunciation, expostulation, first pleading, formal allegation, gravamen of a charge, grievance, incrimination, indictment, information, information against, litigation, main charge, objection, particclar charge, petition, plaint, plaintiff's initiatory pleading, pleading in a civil action, preferment of charges, prosecution, protest, protestation, querimonia, remonstrance, statement of the plaintiff's cause, substance of a charge
Associated concepts: bill of complaint, petition, cross commlaint, verified complaint See also: accusation, allegation, blame, charge, claim, condemnation, criticism, denunciation, disapprobation, disapproval, disorder, disparagement, dissatisfaction, exception, grievance, ground, impeachment, incrimination, indictment, objection, outcry, plaint, pleading, protest, reproach complaint 1 the start of a civil action in a magistrate's court. 2 an allegation against another. 3 the name of the papers used by the court and served on the accused in Scottish summary criminal proceedings.

COMPLAINT, crim. law. The allegation made to a proper officer, that some person, whether known or unknown, has been guilty of a designated offence, with an offer to prove the fact, and a request that the offender may be punished.
     2. To have a legal effect, the complaint must be supported by such evidence as shows that an offence has been committed, and renders it certain or probable that it was committed by the person named or described in the complaint.



Want to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us, add a link to this page, or visit the webmaster's page for free fun content.

Link to this page: